Are you a cat or a dog?

By WEEK Producer

Are you a cat or a dog?

February 29, 2012 Updated Feb 29, 2012 at 11:21 AM CDT

 

Are you a dog or a cat? On tonight's Ask Dr. Joy, we will look at some of the characteristics of why people choose a dog or a cat.

Last year, we looked at a study which was done at the University of Texas identifying if people are cat people or dog people. It was a popular segment, so tonight, we will look at some other ways to define a cat person and a dog person.

A little bit about the basic characteristics of dog vs. cat people:

 

· Cat people are seen as more independent

· Cat people are seen as more neurotic, creative, philosophical and non-traditional

 

· Dog people are seen as more friendly

· Dog people are seen as agreeable, social, and more extroverted

· More people hate cats than those who hate dogs

· Our relationship with dogs throughout history has been different than it has with cats. Cats are seen as more solitary creatures (as are their owners) and Dogs are seen as more pack-like and social

· Dogs intrude on people's activities and feel lonely and want to play while cats are more invisible. Cats will abandon play and leave and dogs typically will engage in play until the owner gives up. This relates to the personality traits of socialization, extroversion, interactions to cat and dog lovers.

· Dog owners tend to be those who also would have a cat as well, but cat owners are more likely to only live with a cat (once again showing the socialization style and friendly nature of dog owners

· Cat people tend to live alone and twice as likely to live in an apartment. In contrast, dog people tend to have children and live in a house. Single women are the most likely to have a cat, and grew up in a house having a cat.

· Cat people score low in dominance personality which relates to those who are forceful, assertive, and self-confident. Dog people score high in dominance. Cat people however are trusting, straight-forward and get along people

What are some suggestions that relates to pet lovers and our mental health?

· Flexibility is important. You may never choose to have a different pet, but just like with people around you…. Look for their positives and see their strengths.

· Be grateful. Remember what pets offer to us-unconditional love, acceptance and friendship. But, don't forget that those around us can give us some of the same offerings.

· Health and well-being. Statistics show that those who have pets tend to live longer, take better care of their physical and mental health and have less medical conditions. So consider the benefits and perhaps you'll be hugging your pet and thanking them for what they give you, or going out and purchasing a pet in 2012.

 

 

What else do we know about the differences about pet ownership and pet personalities?

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