Illinois to follow recent IRS tax season changes

By WEEK Producer

Illinois to follow recent IRS tax season changes

January 11, 2013 Updated Oct 26, 2013 at 2:25 AM CDT

CHICAGO -- Illinois will be following a new federal mandate by the Internal Revenue Service that says taxpayers may begin filing taxes starting January 30.

On Friday, the Illinois Department of Revenue sent out a statement, stating the Illinois will follow the new guidelines.

The IRS will begin accepting tax returns on that date after updating forms and completing programming and testing of its processing systems. According to a federal release, this will reflect the bulk of the late tax law changes enacted on January 2.

"We have worked hard to open tax season as soon as possible," said IRS Acting Commissioner Steven T. Miller.  "This date ensures we have the time we need to update and test our processing systems."

Here are some guidelines provided by the IRS: 

Who Can File Starting Jan. 30?
The IRS anticipates that the vast majority of all taxpayers can file starting Jan. 30, regardless of whether they file electronically or on paper. The IRS will be able to accept tax returns affected by the late Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) patch as well as the three major “extender” provisions for people claiming the state and local sales tax deduction, higher education tuition and fees deduction and educator expenses deduction.
                     

Who Can’t File Until Later?
There are several forms affected by the late legislation that require more extensive programming
 and testing of IRS systems. The IRS hopes to begin accepting tax returns including these tax forms between late February and into March; a specific date will be announced in the near future.
The key forms that require more extensive programming changes include Form 5695 (Residential Energy Credits), Form 4562 (Depreciation and Amortization) and Form 3800 (General Business Credit). A full  listing of the forms that won’t be accepted until later is available on IRS.gov.

For updated information, please visit www.irs.gov.

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