Better Business Bureau encourages shoppers to read nutrition facts up front

Better Business Bureau encourages shoppers to read nutrition facts up front

March 14, 2014 Updated Mar 14, 2014 at 11:07 AM CDT

(BBB news release) March is National Nutrition Month, and Better Business Bureau has joined with other organizations in supporting Facts Up Front, a voluntary effort that puts prominent nutrition labeling on the front of food and beverage packaging.

According to a BBB news release:

“Facts Up Front is a quick and easy way for people to make smart food choices right in the grocery aisle,” notes Brittany Oberdorff, a registered dietitian nutritionist with the Council of Better Business Bureaus and program manager for BBB’s Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI). Thirteen of the 17 companies that participate in CFBAI also are participating in Facts Up Front. “Many of our participants are implementing Facts Up Front, and that’s just another example of their commitment to promoting healthier foods and improving what’s available in the marketplace.”

BBB is sharing these simple Facts Up Front shopping tips to help you make more informed choices at the grocery store. Compare foods and build diets that have:

More nutrients needed for good health. Look for potassium, fiber, calcium, protein, iron and vitamins A, C and D in Facts Up Front labels.

Lower saturated fat. Choose oils for cooking and lean cuts of your favorite meats. Stick with low-fat or fat-free dairy products, and eat seafood a few times a week.

Less sodium. Use Facts Up Front to help identify products with lower amounts of sodium. Try the reduced sodium or no-salt-added versions of your favorite foods, and use more herbs and spices in your cooking to add flavor.

Less sugar. To satisfy your sweet tooth, eat fruits for snacks and/or dessert. Drink water when you’re thirsty.

Calories that help you meet your daily target. Use the Facts Up Front nutrition calculator to determine your daily calorie needs, and check the Facts Up Front labels to see how many calories are in a serving.